REBEKAH FIESCHI TELLS JON MEYERS SOME THINGS SHE’S NEVER TOLD ANYONE ELSE

REBEKAH FIESCHI TELLS JON MEYERS SOME THINGS SHE’S NEVER TOLD ANYONE ELSE

Last month, I had the opportunity to interview my friend Rebekah Fieschi for the second time in the last year.  A lot — and I mean a lot — has happened since the last time.
Rebekah Fieschi is an award-winning writer/director from a tiny island in the south of France. Her new film, Sylphvania Grove, successfully crowdfunded on Seed&Spark and will debut in film festivals later this year.. Her previous, Mauvaises Têtes, is an award-winning reinvention of classic Hollywood horror films such as Frankenstein; Mauvaises Têtes was well received in film festivals around the world. Her focus is to bring more entertaining, yet layered, character driven gothic horror and fantasy films to the screen.
After studying filmmaking in Paris, Rebekah moved to New York in 2010. She is also an advocate of fair gender representation in cinema, she is known for giving nuanced voices to female characters and is part of a group of filmmakers seeking to transform the industry. Her first feature film, Beast, is currently in development.
rebekah2
Rebekah Fieschi (center) with other female filmmakers before the first shot of Sylphvania Grove.
JON MEYERS:  Hello Rebekah Fieschi.  Thank you for this, our second interview, in less than a year.  Why don’t we start by getting my readers caught up.  I’ve spoken to you, of course, of and on — but tell everybody else about what’s happened from the last time we’ve spoken publicly until today, the status of Sylphvania Grove, the preparation for your feature, what you had for breakfast this morning…  You know, the usual.
REBEKAH FIESCHI:  Hey Jon Meyers, I’m thrilled to be speaking with you again so soon! Quite a lot has happened since we spoke last: Sylphvania Grove’s crowdfunding campaign went on to get 200% funded (which I still struggle to believe and feel endlessly grateful for), we shot the film, edited it and went through most of the post production process, I’m hoping I’ll be able to finally say “Sylphvania Grove is done” in a few days (I am DYING to share it with our lead Maxine Wanderer who is truly extraordinary in it, and then of course our supporters and the rest of the world!), and I’ve been submitting a work in progress to a handful of festivals. [Editor’s Note:  While preparing this interview, Rebekah did indeed finish Sylphvania Grove.  There’s no trailer yet — but soon.  Meanwhile, you can check out the teaser here:     ]
JM:  I can’t wait to see the rest of it.  I’m so excited for you.  What else is new?
RF:  Well, I completed my first feature script, Beast, in January. Check out the poster for the script:
beast
JM:  Ooooohhh!  Cool.  Beautiful poster. Tell me more.
RF:  It’s a story I’ve been carrying with me for years and was finally able to put on paper, it’s very different from anything seen before and I can’t wait to connect with people through it. It’s a psychological horror film that tells the story of Bobby, who’s disease threatens to take on a monstrous form while mounting her first stage production. I’m planning  to crowd fund part of it’s budget in 2019, I can’t wait to start talking about it more.
JM:   Same!  Except that my cream cheese was half a schmear (and fat free), and my latte was hot. 
          Beast sounds great.   As usual, what an amazing idea.  And I’m sure, like your other work, it will play well at festivals.  Speaking of festivals, I’m going to Edinburgh this year, in June.  I’ll be sure to tell everybody and anybody about Beast. 
RF:  Spreading the word is always a great help!
JM:  By the way, Edinburgh just announced one of its featured theme retrospectives:  American Woman: Female Directors in American Cinema.  That’s right up our alley, isn’t it?  I’ve been meaning to ask you about this, so now is as good a time as any.  Now that #MeToo permeates the news cycle, do you see yourself altering — in any way — how you make movies?  Like me, you have always been pro-woman.  To those late to the party, are you more “It’s about time, y’all” or “Where’ve you’ve been for the last ten years?”

It’s about time, y’all! I don’t think it will alter the way I make movies, but it definitely gives me more confidence in many ways and makes me feel less alone in my battles. I hope it will change the way a lot of movies are made and bring positive change and safer environments throughout industries.

JM:  So true.  Hey, thanks Rebekah Fieschi for giving me some of your valuable time.  As always you’re always welcome here on my page.  Make sure you let my readers know when that Sylphvania Grove trailer is available.

RF:  Will do, Jon Meyers.  Thanks again for all you do.

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BONUS NEWS:

Rebekah just put up a new Patreon page.  If you want to support her efforts to raise the profile of female filmmakers, you can do so here, for as little as $1 a month:
How cool would it be if you could be one of the first 25 people to support her?   Now’s your chance.
Here are Rebekah’s other links as well:
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